Author: Carol Vanecko

Relocating & Homesickness

This may sound like a strange title for a job blog but homesickness can be a fact of life for many people. Recently while driving and listening to a FM radio station, the DJ played “Lara’s Song” the theme song from “Dr. Zhivago”. It brought back some very vivid memories. Years ago, shortly after the film’s release, I was living and working in London, England. I was wandering around Piccadilly Circus, an entertainment hub, when I decided to spend my afternoon watching a recently-released movie “Dr. Zhivago”. I no sooner saw the vastness of the Russian blue sky after Yuri and his first family left Moscow for their summer home in Siberia than I started to cry. The crying continued for days and my emotional state was painful BECAUSE I was homesick for Canada. O.K., St. Catharines is not Siberia, but Southern Ontario does have huge stretches of open blue sky. Fast forward another 30 years to Laval University in Quebec where I was doing a post-graduate course in French one summer. A girlfriend from Calgary, met at a previous immersion course at McGill University in Montreal, was also there so we chummed around in our spare time. She was uncharacteristically quiet and it was hard to understand what was bothering her. Less than half-way through our session, she announced she had decided to return to Calgary. She missed...

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Résumés, C.V.’s & Cover Letters

Writing a résumé is both an art and a craft that develops over time with education, professional development and experience – in my case 18 years.  I belong to many business organizations and am in constant contact with employers to learn their needs.  As a résumé writer I have to be very logical, clear-thinking and systematic.  My challenge is to make you so interesting that employers can’t wait to interview you. A résumé is a picture in words – it is objective and gives an overview of your professional experience.  Mostly, I write for executives, trades people, educators and college and university graduates.  A specialty I have developed is helping people transition into different careers for various reasons.  Sometimes clients are forced to find new opportunities because they have become redundant or their company has ceased operation.  Another category I see are retirees who only want part-time work to supplement their pensions. The format I use has never varied because it works.  It was developed out with employers and is reviewed from time-to-time.  Letterhead, Highlights of Qualification, Summary, Experience, Community Involvement, Education; Accomplishments.  Sometimes, I add a Skill Set section.  Curriculum Vitaes are somewhat different in that they are for college and university professors. The process involves two meetings of approximately 1-2 hours.  The first is for fact gathering and the second is to proofread and finalize what I have...

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Résumé & Cover Letters – The Question of Costs?

2016 hasn’t been easy for new job hunters and especially those who are upwardly mobile. In plain language “wanting to better them”. Often, I get calls from a parent or spouse asking how much I charge for a “simple résumé”. I answer that my prices are very reasonable but that there is no such thing as a simple résumé. Each person is unique and so are their attributes, experience and career goals. As a seasoned professional résumé’s writer familiar with most professions, 18 years of experience and a proven track record my fee structure reflects my expertise and knowledge. Just as an electrician, a plumber or mechanic have rates, I do too. Résumé and cover letter packages including a free in-person, one-hour consultation, a quality-check and a stringent finalization process typically involve 10-14 hours of work on my part. The cost to clients ranges from $15.00 – $225.00. My prices are actually mid-range but definitely more than downloading free templates from the Internet or paying an unknown, online writer you will never meet by PayPal. Beware of paying separately for a cover letter, the number of résumé pages and no review process who probably just uses a custom template that does not individualize applicants. For more information, please contact me by telephone at 705-743-0058 or by e-mail at cvanecko@cogeco.ca. I’d love to help! Sincerely, Carol The Job Savvy Blogger...

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Are you an Introvert or Extrovert?

You probably already know but just to be sure it would be a good idea to consult Mr Google. Basically, introverts prefer space and time alone to function optimally.  While they may find that crowds and/or large groups of people are idea-forming and fun for short periods, they also tend to deplete them. Extroverts, on the other hand, tend to draw their energy from people in social or large work situations and don’t do well in small or isolated work spaces.   Tips & Tricks for Introverts Open plan offices are usually noisy and not built for introverts who find that they challenge their ability to concentrate. They can:   take a short walk; a coffee break and work from home occasionally.   use noise-cancelling headphones.   come in earlier or stay later than anyone else.   book small meetings with colleagues if possible.   make a point of checking in with colleagues in the morning to keep up with social activities to limit the number of colleagues dropping by unexpectedly.   construct a cubicle of their own. Tips & Tricks for Extroverts It goes without saying that if they are an extrovert they usually only function best working with other people in fast-paced, busy work environments.   they should never consider an isolated work space (office) that colleagues won’t enter unless there was a need to do so....

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Does Your Resume Give Away Your Age?

Of course, we are only human and have learned to be proud of our academic and professional accomplishments. After all, who wants to feel inferior when applying for a job. However, there is an art and science to crafting a perfect resume. I am not exaggerating. Read on to find out why. Reread what I have just written. How many spaces are there after periods? What font face have I used? Double spaces after a period or any mark that ends a sentence are old-fashioned. This is a hard habit to break for long-time keyboarders like me and you. I’m saying that if you are reading this blog. Please forgive me because I celebrate the wisdom and experience that the years have brought me. The font you use should be Arial 11 or 12. 12 is easier to read without glasses but sometimes it is better to use 11 to save space in a long document. Do not include dates on education or certifications that are older than 15 years. Programs are constantly being upgraded and criteria for professional designations have changed a great deal in our fast-moving, technological world. The same caveat applies to work experience but I usually only recommend going back 10 years. However, you can list experience under Objective-Related Experience and Other Experience. For more information, please contact me by telephone at 705-743-0058 or by...

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